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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
the situation with israel and hamas and the gaza strip. we will have that for you live. the conflict in israel and gaza came up today during prime minister's question time in london. >> can i start by going the prime minister in paying tribute to capt. area of the royal regiment of scotland? he showed the utmost courage and bravery and all of our thoughts and condolences are with his family and friends. can i also express my deep sorrow about the loss of life and suffering in israel and gaza in recent days, including the latest terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. there is widespread support on all sides of the house for immediate and durable ceasefire being agreed in israel and gaza. so what will the prime minister set out in his view what are the remaining barriers to this cease-fire agreement being reached? >> i agree with the gentlemen about the appalling news this morning about the terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. can i also express our concern for the people in southern israel and for the grave loss of life in gaza. i think all of us, across the european union, including also ame
with the prime minister of israel. if he gets another term as prime minister, he will be with you throughout your presidency. locked at the hip or perhaps another part of your anatomy. [laughter] your interests state to state our confidence and complementary. you don't have to love each other but you have to out -- but you have a big agenda with each other, that requires you to work together. it is very important for mr. netanyahu to work together with few. you are the great power and israel is the small power. you have a role to play in building a new relationship with him as well. secondly, the second leader i would put on this list is the prime minister of iraq, prime minister of maliki. iraq is the third real of middle east diplomacy. it conjures up such bad memories from the last decade but iraq is important. geography is destiny and iraq's geography between iran and syria is critical to the future of the middle east and to our interests in this part of the world. we have an important role to play with a prime minister of the democratically-elected government and we need to find a way to wor
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: israel and hamas agreed to a cease-fire today, ending eight days of deadly conflict. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise,aul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal p
viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this a
leaders in one of the most dangerous parts of the world. if israel does launch a strike against your country, what will your response be? iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad, at times combative. >> some of the behaviors of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising. how would you feel if one of your children dated a jew? and heated, especially when i asked him about basic human rights for gays. >> do you really believe that someone is born homosexual? >> yes, i absolutely believe that. an extraordinary hour. "piers morgan tonight" starts now. mr. president, welcome to new york. many americans see you as public enemy number one. how do you feel about that? >> the creator, the almighty, the most gracious and the most merciful. and good morning to you. i wish to greet all of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity towards me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish
the discussion of the relationship between u.s., israel, and iran. then we will hear the "washington post" cybersecurity summit. we have several live events to tell you about tomorrow. gregorie dinero will be on to discuss the future of the army. and president obama's campaign rally at the university of colorado, boulder. that is on c-span. [cheers] [applause] >> all right, let's get what documents the coolidge family during the white house years. and also before. >> part of the coolidge family papers. we have one box of photographs. then we have several boxes of other documents. photographs are heavy. the album should be in the back here. here it is. unfortunately, it is on lack civics paper. there's not much we can do about that because we don't want to change the artifact nature of the album itself. starting to crack, some of these pages are separating. this is a photograph of calvin coolidge the day before he became president. he was in plymouth, vermont, visiting his father, doing some chores, this was a press photograph. so he did have the press along with them. you can see that the
. >> coming up, president ahmadinejad's provocative opinions on israel. he tells us what he really meant when he called for the country to be wiped off the map. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] dayquil doesn't treat that. huh? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus rushes relief to all your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. have led to an increase intands clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counselin
-determination of israelis and palestinians. as you know, every american president since lyndon johnson tried to stop israel from building settlements on the west bank because they understood those settlements threatened to fore close the possibility of a two-state solution. some presidents pushed hard; some not very hard. at camp david, jimmy carter believed he received assurances that building would stop and self-determination and would commence, but settlement building did not stop and carter and the egyptians for different reasons did not make too much of a fuss. ronald reagan called for a settlement freeze without making a big issue of it. george hw bush made an issue of it paying a steep political price which may have cost him re-election. bill clinton wanted a viable state, and he found settlement building cometted whether israel was headed by labor, and, indeed, accelerated throughout the 1990s. barack obama made a settlement freeze that jumping off point for his peace efforts, and he was smacked down decisively by benjamin netanyahu. the reason is obvious. israel, no matter what coalition was in ch
leaders who were lackeys of the united states and israel, were out of touch with the youth ask the populations in their countries, whereas the president of syria was a young 45 at the time. he was a computer nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in
the world. teachers in israel are using oragami but not to make betiful fires. >> reporter: math teachers began using oragami about ten years ago. students are making geometry shapes. >> translator: when it comes to solving problems i find that oragami makes it easier. >> reporter: the teacher brought the craft to schools. when she was a child she watched a tv show about oragami. then she started making her own. 20 years ago she visited japan. it fascinated her. upon her return to israel she visited schools all over the country. she tried to introduce oragami as a teaching school. >> they laughed at me and said you ku go to the community center and teach a class. i really believed in it. >> reporter: her husband supported her through thick and thin. he's an oragami designer and the two meet at an international oragami event. through trial and error they figured out how to use it in math classes. >> i can fold a piece of paper. i'm in control. it's my body that's making it. my hands, my eyes, my brain. there's a fantastic sense of achievement even if you do the simplest thing when you're f
between syria and israel, after days of cross border fire, now israel's president sits down with cnn for an exclusive interview about the back and forth and how his country will respond. you will hear what he had to say coming up next. questions? anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. [ female announcer ] live the regular life. (child screaming underwater)... (underwater noises). ♪ ♪ >>> israel is warning syria, keep the conflict internal. israeli defense forces fired into syria after a syrian mortar shell hit near a military post in the northern israeli city of golan heights. this is the first time israel has fired on syria since 1973. senior international correspondent sara sidner is in jerusalem. sara, i know you sat down for an exclusive interview with shimon peres. what did he say about syria? >> reporter: let's talk about that, because what is happening
east. elections are coming up in israel, in jordan, in egypt, iran and elsewhere. we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations of which are being felt on everyone of that country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain domestic politics is at a low boil ready to burst out in a way that can affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there are two problems at the far ends of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on the one hand and the spread of al qaeda and affiliated terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate and lest we forget within a year of taking office both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challenged their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush and the arab spring for president obama. so there's a lot on the agenda. today we're going to take a early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now we at the washington institute, for us this is just the beginn
? and what does that mean for is cale and the -- israel and rest of the middle east? former ambassador to the u.n. dan gillerman will be with us moments away. he will give us his perspective coming up. bill: a surprise announcement from israel. president ehud barak says he is quit politics but will stay on after the january elections in israel. often seen as a moderating force and in considering possible military action. he is 70 years old. he says he wants to spend more time with his family. that news out of israel. martha: it is a very busy morning here in "america's newsroom.". ahead evidence iran has used the recent israel-gaza crisis as a bit of distraction from the rest of the world. we have details on secret operations ahead in a fox news exclusive. bill: was this a white house cover up after the days after the attacks in benghazi and the days before? there are new allegations from leading republicans on that. kt mcfarland will break it down. >> it is assumed the proportions of any other major scandal in this town. there are many layers to the onions. there are all kinds of ques
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti- israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are going to be much greater. they are leaving an impression there is something unfair. this is the time you need correspondents who have spent years in the region, because by and large, you ask what i think of the coverage. i think it is surface. it focuses on the casualties. you do not know what the possibilities may be for agreement on the sides. i think that is one thing we hav
are very high you heard israel's prime minister binyamin netanyahu at u.n. a month ago and israel did a strike against arms manufacturing in sudan. the fact they would come out this aggressively is bad about how bad how quickly it can get violent. >>shepard: to have done it if it is in their airspace is one thing but this is international airspace. >>guest: it is but you get in tit for tat. we can say one thing, believe one thing but that doesn't mean in domestic consumption for iran we believe that. we get into issues about whether it is 12 nautical miles some say it exists beyond that and some say rocks a mile off their coast are part their property. so there are issues on that. but from an iranian domestic consumption point of view it is a huge win for the iranian government to do this showing in the face of strong sanctions they are still able to put fighters in the air and they are not going to be pushed around by the west. >>shepard: i guess as you try to unite your people who do not have enough gas or food it is a valuable weapon. >>guest: exactly. that is a reason it is such a
what scenarios you would put on the table? and are you concerned about israel? >> israel's interesting because israel has a lot at stake but israel is also an independent decisionmaker. and they have their own interests in this and they have made it clear that they are not prepared to accept without some kind of military action iran with a clear path to nuclear weapon. so in some sense it will force us to pay attention to this issue, which we should. there are a lot of options. i think what we need to think about are not options but scenarios. one scenario would be for the administration to reengage with the iranians diplomatically, with the other countries involved, so-called p-5, 5 permanent members of the security council plus germany to make a fairly robust offer to the iranians of the kinds of things available to the iranian people of the regimes to give up this nuclear program and test them and to see if there is a diplomatic outcome. it's acceptable. if there isn't i think the process will be important in order for the administration to set up whatever options might follow the f
talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing o
not just for jordan or for israel or for iraq, it is real threat for region security, and that might be one day like maybe yemen. even american interest. so we are not just blaming united states just because we are friends. it is real. i want, therefore, three times, you know, syrian turkish border. educate imagine how much is becoming a regional threat for the security region. the second thing i think united states past -- you're always talk about human rights supporting democracy, supporting kids rights and human rights. what about the serious? now, i really was crying when i was sitting the kids going to school for two years. and they might be terrorists. so my last comment is what is the incentive for, if you are just going to -- [inaudible] and i am sure those will not be good news for united states. >> i think one of the things that we haven't heard at all here, and yet should be uppermost in our minds is what went wrong with iraq, is what happened the day after. it's what you think about how you defeat bashar or getting to be part of a negotiated solution, fine, but i think one of th
this panel is syria. but what is happening in israel as we gather here this week? these are the questions of our time. these are the challenges of our generation and. that, i think, is one of the great benefits of opportunities like halifax, to have a very in- depth discussion on how we got as a community -- a community of democracies, a community of countries that care, are compassionate, and are able to do something to stop the slaughter of innocent civilians. >> there were many who say we need to have more young emerging democracies that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our c
's all this controversy about whether or not israel is going to go to war with iran. when president obama spoke about the big yellowbird i don't think he was talking about the big yellowbird i think that he was talking about big bird on tv. chinese oriented people referred to as yellow. china has the largest population on earth, a billion people. they have so many people that the force women to have abortions. they have no respect for human rights at all, and china is friends with iran. china is trading partners with iran. if we have israel go to war with iran, then we are going to have to deal with an angry china, and i think that of really big problem, and we have to put a stop to it and negotiate peace. as i sit in the opening statement, i feel that our biggest problem is the deficit, but i believe that the reason why we haven't been able to lower the national debt is because our political system is broken, and we need to fix it or this will continue whether we have a republican or democrat in the presidency or in the majority of congress, and it is why constitutional amendment with th
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)